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(TCOs 1 and 5) In Chapter 11, we learned about four forms of inductive reasoning. Consider the following example. “Most of the CEOs

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  1. (TCOs 1 and 5) In Chapter 11, we learned about four forms of inductive reasoning. Consider the following example.
    “Most of the CEOs you see on television are Republicans, so it is pretty certain that CEOs are going to be Republican.” 
    In this inductive argument, which form of reasoning is being used?
  2.  
    (TCOs 1and 5) In Chapter 11, we learned about three forms of inductive reasoning. Consider the following example.
    “Most members of the House of Representatives take large campaign contributions; therefore, it is safe to conclude that most members of the Senate also take large campaign contributions.” 
     In this inductive argument, based on a comparison of the two house of Congress, which form of reasoning is being used?
  3.  
    (TCOs 6 and 7) In Chapter 7, we learned how to identify inductive fallacies, which are arguments that offer only weak support for their conclusions because their evidence is either weak or biased. Consider the following example.
    “All the people who called into the radio station said that they liked the president’s plan. Clearly, the president is popular with the American people. 
    The inductive fallacy used is:
  4.  
    (TCO 2) In Chapter 7, we learned how to identify fallacies related to cause and effect. These fallacies suggest a causal connection between two events, where no evidence for the causation is presented. Consider the following example.
    “Studies show that when violence in the media is more frequent, violence in society is more frequent.” 
    The causal fallacy used is:
  5.  
    (TCO 5) In Chapter 11, we learned three principles for forming causal hypotheses. It is important to remember that these principles only suggest, but do not establish a causal connection. Consider the following example.
    “Gas prices have gone up by 60 cents a gallon in the past three months. It seems to be related to that oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico a while back. Must have depleted domestic oil reserves.”
    In this causal hypothesis, the principle used is:

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