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(TCOs 2, 7, and 9) In Chapter 6, we learned to recognize how fallacies of relevance are used to distract the audience from the real issue.

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  1. (TCOs 2, 7, and 9) In Chapter 6, we learned to recognize how fallacies of relevance are used to distract the audience from the real issue. Consider the following example.
    "What’s wrong with soccer? It’s just not American. No one here likes it."
    The fallacy of relevance used is
  2.  
    (TCOs 2, 7, and 9) In Chapter 6, we learned to recognize how fallacies of relevance are used to distract the audience from the real issue. Consider the following example.
    PROF: “I gave you a D on your essay because your organization was terrible, your arguments were not relevant to the issue, and your grammar was so bad it was difficult to read.”
    STUDENT: “Yeah. Well, my dad’s a big contributor to this university. See how long your job lasts after I talk to him!”
    The fallacy of relevance used by the student is
  3.  
    (TCOs 7 and 9) In Chapter 6, we learned to recognize how fallacies of relevance are used to distract the audience from the real issue. Consider the following example.
    “If cigarettes aren't bad for you, then how come it's so hard on your health to smoke?”
    The fallacy of relevance assuming the truth without offering proof is
  4.  
    (TCOs 7 and 9) In Chapter 6, we learned to recognize how fallacies of relevance are used to distract the audience from the real issue. Consider the following example.
    “The Congressman thought the president's behavior was an impeachable offense. But that's nonsense, coming from the Congressman. He had an adulterous affair himself, after all.”
    The fallacy of relevance used is

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